In uprisings in Tunisia and Egypt and there were

Inconclusion, social media had a big impact on the Egyptian revolution but it wasnot the cause of it. It was an important tool in helping to organise protestsand to generate support for the protest movement.

Social media websitesintroduced an instant method of communication amongst people that hadn’t beenused in protesting before. However, it was simply a tool that helped theuprising happen much quicker. The cause of the uprising was the strength of theworking-class people who fought against 30 years of oppression againstMubarak’s leadership. Further research taken on this topic could include theaftermath of this uprising and how Egypt have struggled to elect a settledgovernment. Mubarak’s government was replaced by the Muslim Brotherhood whowere seen to be as oppressive and were ousted by a military coup in 2013.

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Theparty was replaced by Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, who also imposed repression andintimidation on the people. Another area of further study is how the Egyptianrevolution impacted on other middle eastern countries. The Arab Spring beganwith the uprisings in Tunisia and Egypt and there were subsequent protests inLibya, Yemen, Syria and Bahrain where either the regime was overthrown or majoruprisings and violence occurred. There were many demonstrations in other middleeastern countries such as Morocco, Iraq, Algeria and Lebanon. However, many otherprotests were unsuccessful as they were met with violent responses from theauthorities. Some large-scale conflicts resulted after these protests such asthe Syrian Civil War. ConclusionHundredsof thousands of protesters gathered in Tahrir Square during the January 25thprotests in 2011. Mubarak resigned 18 days later after 30 years as Egypt’spresident.

Egypt were among many middle eastern countries that had uprisingsfrom 2010 until 2012 in what became known as the Arab Spring. Egypt tookinspiration from the Tunisian uprising that had taken place a year earlier.This gave the Egyptian people hope that they could have successful protestsagainst the leader Mubarak.

The social media platforms provided a way tocommunicate and organise demonstrations in a way that traditional methodscouldn’t keep up with. One protester is quoted as saying “We use Facebook toschedule the protests, Twitter to coordinate, and YouTube to tell the world.”Social media was well embedded into the lives of Egypt’s youth population atthe time with 60% of Egyptians under the age of 30 using it. The Facebook page”We are all Khaled Said” was an important way to instil unity amongst theEgyptian people by paying respect to a 28-year-old murdered by the police. TheFacebook page had 100,000 followers in three days and became the most followedpage in the middle east. This use of social media helped galvanise the peopleThe Egyptian revolution didn’t happen because of social media. It was aboutmore than just people who had access to Twitter and Facebook. The thousands ofworking class people fighting against years of oppression was the real cause ofthe uprising.

The protests demonstrated the solidarity and resilience among theworking class Egyptian people. HypothesisevidenceAresearch method that I used was a case study. The case of Khaled Said who wasbeaten and tortured to death by Egyptian police showed the corruption of theEgyptian government and the police force. The 28-year-old had merely posted avideo of two police officers dividing confiscated drugs between themselves. Thebrutality shown by the police was proof of the lack of freedom that theEgyptian people had. The brutality of his murder galvanised the Egyptian peopleand the Facebook page set up in Khaled Said’s honour increased the support forthe protests.

  Research Method Social media introduced anew way for Egyptian people to organise protests and spread a message ofdefiance. There was increasing violence used by police in the final years ofMubarak’s leadership. This led to millions of Egyptians demanding that Mubarakbe overthrown from being the leader of Egypt. Social media websites played animportant role in this uprising, especially in the organising of the January 25protests. According to Internet World Stats, in February 2010, over 21% ofEgypt’s population had access to the internet and more than 4.5 millionEgyptians used Facebook.

These stats showed that the internet had a huge numberof users in Egypt. The hypothesis for thisassignment is that social media had a big impact on the Egyptian revolution butthat the revolution would have still occurred without it. The point I am makingin this assignment is that social media had a big impact because it createdsuch a quick and instant way for people to communicate with each other. It tookjust 18 days from the start of the protests to overthrow the Egyptian leaderMubarak. The impact that social media had is that it helped the protests becomemore popular and widespread across the country.

This enabled the Egyptianpeople to overthrow the leader Mubarak in a period of just over 2 weeks. Ibelieve that the revolution would have still occurred without the help ofsocial media because people were protesting against years of oppression. Theresilience of the Egyptian people was the cause of the uprising. However, itwouldn’t have happened in such a short space of time without the help of socialmedia. Hypothesis Iam investigating the impact that social media had on the Egyptian Revolution in2011.

This uprising occurred because of the political corruption, human rightsviolations and high levels of unemployment in Egypt during Hosni Mubarak’s aspresident. Social media provided a platform for Egyptian people to expresstheir views and spread their message of defiance in protest against the leaderMubarak. Social media was an important tool because it enabled people toorganise demonstrations and protests against the government. It was also agreat way to generate support for the protest movement. Social media wasimportant because it provided a way for people to instantly communicate andinteract with each other and spread the protesters’ message of defiance. The Facebookpage set up to honour Khaled Said, who was tortured to death by police, was away of showing this unity amongst the Egyptian people. However, I don’t believethat social media was the cause of the uprising.

I believe that the revolutionwould have occurred without it. Social media was definitely an important toolfor the protest movement and the uprising would have definitely taken longerthan 18 days without it. I believe that the uprising still would have occurredbut it would have been a much longer process. MainargumentFacebookwas used during the revolution to plan and arrange protests.

On the 6thof June 2010, Khaled Saeed, a 28-year old Egyptian who posted a video of policeofficers sharing confiscated drugs between themselves was tortured to death bytwo police officers in Alexandria, Egypt. Eye witnesses described that hepleaded for mercy and asked why they were doing this to him, but they continuedto torture him until his death. A Facebook page was set up to show solidarityfor the victim who had been tortured to death by Egyptian police. It was called”We are all Khaled Said”. It gathered 100,000 followers in three days and was asign of unity among the Egyptian people. It showed the extent of corruption inthe Egyptian government at the time and increased popularity for the protestmovement.

Egyptian president Mubarak was planning to appoint his son as hissuccessor and protests were held because of this on the 21stSeptember 2010. Egyptian people were inspired by the Tunisians successfulremoval of their president. The “We are all Khaled Said” Facebook page was usedto spread messages to organise protests on the 25th January 2011. TheFacebook page had a huge number of followers and news about the protests spreadquickly and this encouraged huge numbers of people to protest on the streets.On 28th January over one million people joined the protests on whatwas known as “Friday of rage”. The protesters faced huge obstacles but theywere successful after 18 days of protesting as president Mubarak resigned fromhis presidency on the 11th February 2011.

TheRole of Social Media in the Egyptian Revolution: The Initiation Phase(2010-2011) was an academic journal written by Amir Zeid and Fatima Al-Khalaf. In thisacademic journal, the writers investigated the role that social media played inthe Egyptian Revolution that began on January 25th 2011. Theyinvestigate why the Egyptian Revolution became known as a “Social MediaRevolution.

” The number of people who participated in the protests grew rapidlybecause of the number of people using social media and the amount ofinformation that could be sent instantly.Abook called Liberation Square: Inside the Egyptian Revolution andthe Rebirth of a Nation by Ashraf Khalil was wrote in 2012.The author, Ashraf Khalil was a journalist based in Cairo at the time of therevolution.

As a journalist based in Cairo, Ashraf Khalil was an eyewitness tothe protests and demonstrations that brought Mubarak’s 30-year reign as leaderof Egypt to an end. Khalil was amongst those who were subjected to tear gasexplosions in Tahrir Square during the protests. He speaks about the moderntechnologies that helped unite Egyptian people. During the protests, theEgyptian government realised the influence that social media could have anddecided to cut off internet and cell phone communication across Egypt onJanuary 28th 2011. This was an attempt to derail the protests but ithad the opposite effect. This ban on internet access galvanised the Egyptianpeople because they saw it as a further attack on their freedom rights.

A journal article called The Arab Spring: Social Media in theEgyptian revolution: Reconsidering Resource Mobilization Theory was writtenby Nahed Eltantawy and Julie B. Wiest. The article argues that social mediaplayed a hugely important role in the success of the anti-government proteststhat led to Mubarak resigning as leader of Egypt. The article also calls forfurther investigation into the incorporation of social media as a usefulresource for collective action and the organisation of important socialmovements.

The article states that modern communication technologies such associal media have become important ways to help the mobilization of collectiveaction and the ensuing creation and organisation of social movements around theworld. Social media introduced an instant way for people to communicate andjoin social networking groups to show support for the protests. The articlealso gives a background to the 18-day revolution against president Mubarak. Itdescribes the factors that led to the events that triggered the protestsagainst Mubarak, particularly the corruption of presidential and parliamentaryelections and the oppressive conditions for Egyptian citizens that preventedfree expression, protest opportunities and a decent standard of living. Relevant literatureResearch question: Howdid social media impact on the Egyptian Revolution in 2011?